Monthly Archives: June 2019

Search for missing Coogee mum intensifies

Missing since Wednesday morning: Jessica Bialek. Picture: FacebookPolice are scouring hotels, parks and reserves throughout Sydney as the search intensifies for a young mother who vanished from her Coogee home.
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Jessica Bialek, an accomplished photographer who has worked for the Australian Ballet and the Bangarra Dance Theatre, left her home on Dudley Street in Coogee just after 8.30am on Wednesday to walk to a nearby bank.

Detectives have visited the bank on Thursday morning in an effort to determine whether bank transactions showing up on her account recently were made in the past 24 hours.

The 37-year-old failed to return home to her husband and young daughter on Wednesday morning, alarming family and friends who have mounted a search to find her.

Ms Bialek’s husband, Sabino Matera, said he had been unable to reach his wife since he last spoke to her when she left home.

He posted a desperate message on Facebook around 8pm on Wednesday night, asking people to help him find her.

“She left home without her car and [has] not made contact nor returned home. Her phone is off. This is a real alarm,” he wrote on Facebook, where he is also circulating his wife’s photograph.

Eastern Beaches police commander, Detective Superintendent Gavin Dengate, said police were looking in “all public places, canvassing through motels within the area and speaking to relatives, friends and loved ones”.

Ms Bialek, who has a background in dance and singing, is a freelance photographer specialising in performing arts photography, as well as fashion.

Other companies she has worked for include Opera Victoria, Circus Oz and the Victorian College of the Arts.

Police have launched an investigation into her disappearance, and say they hold concerns for her welfare.

Ms Bialek is described as being between 170-175 centimetres tall, with a slim build and dark hair.

Anyone who has seen her in the past day, or who has any information that could assist investigators, has been urged to contact Maroubra police on (02) 9349 9299 or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Fountain restored

THANKS to members of the Rotary Club of Singleton, the Munro Fountain has been, once again, restored.
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Rotary Club of Singleton president Warren Deaves,Dennis Allen and John Henderson

The water feature was originally a horse watering fountain donated to the town by the first mayor of the municipality, Alexander Munro.

“It was built in a foundry in Glasgow, transported to Australia and erected in the centre of George Street,” club president Warren Deaves said.

“It served its purpose for many years in the horse drawn era.

“However, it was removed when motor cars took over and, unfortunately, parts of the fountain werescattered around town.”

It wasn’t until 1982 that the Rotary Club of Singleton decided to retrieve the parts, restore the fountain and re-erect it in front of the Singleton Museum where it stands today.

This year’srestoration is, in fact, the third in the past three decades thatthe Rotary club has undertaken.

Mr Deaves felt that given the significance of this Singletonlandmark, he wanted to make the restoration one of his projects in 2015.

“Many hands make light work,” he said.

“Other willing helpers from the club were Dennis Allen, who was heavily involved in the previous two restorations, Bill Gee, Kerrie Bartrim, Marty Pall and John Henderson.

“Wonderful support was also provided by Tutt Bryant and Bunnings.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New Cats purring

MUSWELLBROOK Cats will come up against one of the early favourites for the Black Diamond AFL premiership in their first round match at Weeraman Oval on Saturday.
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The Cats finished ninth last season but several new recruits have strengthened the squad ahead of their clash with The Entrance Bateau Bay.

Captain Bryan Martin said the addition of players like Adam Highnam, Jedd Stojakovic, Nigel Smith, Jake Parker and Tate Berry had added much-needed experience and depth.

“Some of the new blokes haven’t played for a while but they’ve got the skill and grew up with the sport so they know it,” he said.

“Once you get over 50 games of experience you really have an understanding of the game, so it helps us out a lot already.

“We’re all relatively fit but in this competition you don’t have to be a super athlete, so you can fit in well if you know the game.”

Martin said Bateau Bay would be tough opponents given their strong recruitment of players over the past few years.

“They’re in a great area down on the Central Coast and they’ve got around 200-plus registered juniors in their camp,” he said.

“They’ll be pretty pacey but I think with what we’ve got, learned and built on from last year that we’ll be alright.”

Martin also praised the work of coach Brian Scott and his assistant Troy Garling over the course of the pre-season.

The Cats head into the game on the back of several indifferent results but Martin said it was all part of the learning process.

Muswellbrook played in the inaugural pre-season carnival, which saw Tamworth, Newcastle City, Maitland and Singleton compete for the first trophy on offer this year.

While the Cats failed to win a match during the carnival, they were able to give players valuable game time.

Tomorrow’s match will start at 1pm and entry is free.

CONTEST: New Cats recruits Jedd Stojakovic and Adam Highnam challenge for the ball on Wednesday.

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Tatyoon’s golden prospect

Navarre Minerals’ exploration manager Wess Edgar surveying the Tatyoon area. Navarre Minerals diagram showing confi rmed basalt dome targets in the region (highlighted in red) including at Tatyoon where drilling commenced this week.
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TATYOON could be the source of the region’s next gold boom with Navarre Minerals commencing a drilling project this week in search of the precious commodity.

The project includes a reverse circulation and diamond drilling program totalling up to 2000 metres across a stretch of land about 1.5 kilometres long near Tatyoon.

The focus will be to collect samples for testing from an interpreted basalt dome structure deep below the surface, with studies suggesting the potential of mineralised sediments which lead to the formation of gold.

Navarre Minerals managing director Geoff McDermott said the exploration project should last three to four weeks.

“We are trying to have it all done before the cropping season begins, so we are working in with the farmers of the area to make sure we are off the ground and have everything tidied up before they start their operations,” he said.

“We will be doing roughly 2000 metres of drilling over about 10 to 15 holes. Individual holes will be anywhere from about 60 metres deep through to about 300.”

Mr McDermott said percussion drilling is a quick process which sees the equipment hammer through rock to the basalt dome where the sample will be collected and logged with geologists.

While Navarre Minerals is hoping to emulate similar grades of gold that have been discovered at Stawell, Mr McDermott ensured that this is not a mining project.

“We’re not allowed to mine, we have an exploration license and our aim is to prove that there is or isn’t gold in the rocks below,” he said.

“We have done all the groundwork to believe that we have a target there. Stawell is the model that we have been using, the Magdala mine, and they are currently mining at roughly four grams of gold per tonne.

“So if we could see four grams over a distance of four or five metres down that would be pretty good. We are hoping to see not only the gold grade, but rock alteration, so minerals such as sulphide.”

Navarre Minerals held a community consultation meeting last month where representatives informed local residents of the exploration procedure.

If enough gold is discovered in thesamples collected at Tatyoon thatmining is warranted, one suggestionis transporting potential ore by railor road to the Stawell Gold Mines forprocessing.

Mr McDermott said NavarreMinerals, based in Stawell, andlandholders at Tatyoon had cooperatedwell during the testing phaseand hoped that continued as drillingcommenced.

“We had some really good discussionswith the Tatyoon people andwhile they are concerned that explorationis going to lead to a mine, wehave been able to allay a lot of theirfears about what we are trying to do.We have been working very closelywith one of the key landholders thatwe plan to drill on,” he said.

“I think one of the importantpoints is that Navarre Minerals is alocal company that lives and worksin the area. We are not from Perthor Melbourne, we are a part of thecommunity and I think they takecomfort from that fact and that ourreputation means a lot to us.

“Without the landholder consentand them being happy, we can’t doour business. That is what we prideourselves on.”

Ancient seafl oor basalt domes arewhere elements in the Earth’s crustare mineralised into gold.

A large section of WesternVictoria, including Stawell andArarat, sits along a major structurefault which houses a number basaltdomes with potential gold in them.

Mr McDermott said NavarreMinerals was keen to explore anumber of sites in the area to seewhat lies beneath.

“We have just been granted anexploration license that coversfrom Ararat to Great Western andwe believe we have another coupleof these types of targets (similarto Tatyoon) that sit around there,which we will be looking into over thecoming weeks and months,” he said.

“We are excited and have ourfingers crossed. We call the drillrig the ‘truth machine’ and we arehoping that it comes up with somegood results.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Staph infection rate high at Calvary Mater hospital

THE Hunter’s second biggest hospital has recorded higher rates of the potentially deadly golden staph infection than any other hospital in Australia.
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The Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital had 15 cases of staph in 2013/14, at a rate of 2.48 cases per 10,000 bed stays.

There were 43 cases at the John Hunter Hospital, the third highest number of cases recorded at a major hospital nationally but with rate of 1.61 per 10,000 bed stays, it fell below the benchmark limit of 2 per 10,000 bed stays.

The results, released by the National Health and Performance Authority on Thursday, highlight the fact that patients are up to three times more likely to catch the bloodstream infection depending on the hospital where they receive care.

Estimates suggest that up to one in three people who experience healthcare-associated Golden Staph, otherwise known as Staphylococcus aureus, die from it or a related cause.

Maitland Hospital recorded an infection rate of 1.52 per 10,000 bed stays, against the peer average of 1.15.

The director of clinical services at the Calvary Mater Newcastle, Roslyn Everingham, said the report must be read in context.

‘‘Calvary Mater Newcastle cares for a very high proportion of highly vulnerable patients with compromised immune systems, which puts them at greater risk of infection,’’ she said.

One-third of the hospital’s acute patients are oncology patients, and three-quarters of the reported cases involved medical oncology or haematology patients, she said.

‘‘Of the 15 reported cases, eight were admitted to the hospital as inpatients with the others receiving care as outpatients.’’

The hospital had worked hard to lower rates of infection, she said.

‘‘Calvary Mater Newcastle has a rigorous policy of surveillance testing, which highlights early signs of infection to allow prompt intervention and lessens the risk of morbidity and mortality.’’